Inclusion, sport and a manifesto for adult education

Award-winning sportspeople have had a big impact in the WEA this week.

One of Great Britain’s most successful Paralympians, Tanni Grey-Thompson, gave the WEA’s Annual Lecture on 11 June at Birkbeck University. She seemed disarmingly easy-going as she packed several powerful political points into her speech, talking with unpretentious warmth and wit.

Tanni Grey-Thompson and Ruth Spellman

Tanni Grey-Thompson and Ruth Spellman

She recalled her response to being told as a young woman that her wheelchair was a fire risk in a public building: “I’ve never spontaneously combusted before.” Her anecdotes about being a traveller in a wheelchair were shocking and absurd in equal measure. Her response? “I don’t want special treatment, just the same miserable commute as everyone else.”

Tanni’s commitment to politics for social good and to education as an enabler shone through. This was a very appropriate context for Ruth Spellman, our CEO and General Secretary, to launch the WEA’s Manifesto – “Making a difference to communities throughout the UK”.

The Manifesto includes nine key recommendations:

1. Ensure there is always an opportunity for adults to return to learning
2. Promote equality, opportunity and productivity at work
3. Develop educational opportunities for the most disadvantaged
4. Help people stay active throughout life through health education
5. Reduce health inequalities to give people more control over their own wellbeing
6. Promote tolerance and inclusion through access to English
7. Value lifelong learning so adults of any age can study
8. Help parents become educational role models
9. Value volunteering through a single credible set of measurements

While Tanni was talking in London, members of the Bumble Bees Barbarians mixed ability rugby team were appearing on the BBC’s  Look North regional news programme as it was broadcast from Leeds.

Bumbles_LookNorth

Harry Gration, Amy Garcia, Anthony Brooke, Leon Taylor, Dan Cookson, Martino Corazza. (Photo by Joseph Haskey, WEA)

The Bingley-based Bumble Bees have been awarded the prestigious Rugby Football Union President’s Award for their innovative mixed ability approach to the game and for using rugby as a vehicle for social change. The WEA hasn’t moved into sports management but is working in partnership with the players to promote inclusion and to challenge stereotypes about disability.

WEA tutor Mark Goodwin has worked with the players since a student on another WEA course asked about setting up a rugby team. The educational aspects of the partnership have enabled players with Learning Disabilities to develop skills for describing and presenting their experiences in sport to RFU clubs so that neighbouring teams can get over their “fear factor” of playing against disabled players and mixed ability teams.

The Bumbles have gained in confidence, become accomplished public speakers and taught others about diversity and inclusion. It’s been a win-win process and we’ve all learnt a lot.

Tanni Grey-Thompson said in her lecture that, “If you’re told constantly that you can’t do things you might start to believe it.” She and the Bumbles show what’s possible when people believe that they can do things, but they don’t sugar-coat their messages.

Advertisements

About Ann Walker
Adult education and lifelong learning specialist and campaigner. LinkedIn: http://linkd.in/1GI0QK1

Thoughts, comments or links to other resources? Click here to add.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: